medicine

Futurism: We Now Have Evidence That a Marijuana Compound Can Help People With Psychosis

Futurism: We Now Have Evidence That a Marijuana Compound Can Help People With Psychosis

MIND CONTROL. Some people recreationally partake in cannabis to free their minds. But the plant’s non-intoxicating compound, cannabidiol (CBD), might actually be able to help others rein their minds in.

According to a new study from King’s College London (KCL), just one dose of CBD can reduce abnormal brain function in people with psychosis, a condition in which a person experiences a disconnect from reality and may see, hear, or believe things that aren’t actually real.

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WeedHorn: High Hopes for Marijuana and Alzheimer's

WeedHorn: High Hopes for Marijuana and Alzheimer's

High Hopes for Alzheimer's There may be hope for the 5.2 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer's Disease, the most common form of dementia. This figure is certain to rise as it is currently the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. While the cause of the disease is unknown, what is known is that inflammation in the brain and beta-amyloid plaque buildup create the problem. Amyloid plaque is a toxic protein and its build up prevents neuron communication.

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Leafly: Cannabinoids 101: What makes cannabis medicine?

Leafly: Cannabinoids 101: What makes cannabis medicine?

One hefty word that belongs in every medical marijuana patient’s vocabulary is cannabinoid. Cannabinoids (e.g., THC and CBD) are the chemical compounds secreted by cannabis flowers that provide relief to an array of symptoms including pain, nausea, and inflammation. These work their medicinal magic by imitating compounds our bodies naturally produce, called endocannabinoids, which activate to maintain internal stability and health. To put a complex system simply, they mediate communication between cells, and when there is a deficiency or problem with our endocannabinoid system, unpleasant symptoms and physical complications occur.

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Green Flower Media: How to avoid cannabis-fueled anxiety

Green Flower Media: How to avoid cannabis-fueled anxiety

Near the center of our brains we have a twin set of neuron bundles called the amygdalae, responsible for importing cognitive processes, including fear and are fight or flight response.

The discovery that these amygdalae contain cannabinoid receptors – as verified by researchers at Vanderbilt University in 2014 – is a major step in understanding how cannabis can actually treat anxiety.

The idea is that these receptors depend on cannabinoids to do their job, to regulate all of those important emotional processes – as well as a ton of other processes in the body.

But sometimes the body doesn’t produce enough of its own cannabinoids – what we call endocannabinoids. In the case of anxiety, for example, research indicates that traumatic experiences can actually hinder the production of these endocannabinoids.

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