DEA

NPR: FDA Green Lights Marijuana-Based Pharmaceutical Drug

NPR: FDA Green Lights Marijuana-Based Pharmaceutical Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a marijuana-derived drug for the treatment of two rare and serious forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, that begin in childhood but can persist in adulthood.

The drug is made from purified cannabidiol, or CBD, a compound found in the cannabis plant. The drug will be marketed under the brand name Epidiolex.

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Huffington Post: Feds Open Door To More Pot Research While Keeping It Classified As One Of ‘Most Dangerous’ Drugs

Huffington Post: Feds Open Door To More Pot Research While Keeping It Classified As One Of ‘Most Dangerous’ Drugs

The Drug Enforcement Administration announced Thursday that it is ending the federal government’s decades-long monopoly on cultivation of marijuana for research purposes, a move that is expected to usher in more scientific analysis of the plant’s medical benefits. But the agency also declined to reclassify the drug, leaving marijuana on the government’s list of “most dangerous” narcotics, along with heroin and LSD.

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Ganjapreneur: New DEA Chief Says Cannabis Should Remain Schedule I

by Adam Lozier on September 10, 2015

Chuck Rosenberg, the recently appointed head of the Drug Enforcement Agency, said in an interview with Fox News last week that cannabis should not be reclassified under federal law.

Though he acknowledged that marijuana “certainly is not as dangerous as other Schedule I controlled substances,” he said that he doesn’t “frankly see a reason to remove” it from the Schedule I category.

The category is supposed to be reserved for drugs that are easily abused and have no medical purpose. Although Rosenberg supports continuing research on marijuana’s medical uses, he claims that the evidence isn’t there yet: “If we come up with a medical use for it, that would be wonderful. But we haven’t.”

Paradoxically, Rosenberg acknowledged the failure of alcohol prohibition while remaining opposed to marijuana legalization.

“We tangled with [prohibition] as a society in the 1930s. And we know how that went,” he said. “I choose not to drink alcohol, but I’m not going to impose that on anyone else.”

“I’m not willing to say that [cannabis is] good for you, or that it ought to be legalized. I think it’s bad for you and that it ought to remain illegal,” he argued.